yukoshimizu:

New book Illustration Next. A gorgeous spread by my former student Keiko Tokushima

anabargagli:

Orchid hunter, floral experimenter, wall typographer
A look into the novel orchid workshop of Yoichiro Uchida, in Fukuoka Japan. An interesting concept, and a beautiful mise en forme. One of my favorite blogs PingMag did a very nice article on him that you can read here. It’s worth a look! Also, you can find his workshop tumblr here. Enjoy!
anabargagli:

Orchid hunter, floral experimenter, wall typographer
A look into the novel orchid workshop of Yoichiro Uchida, in Fukuoka Japan. An interesting concept, and a beautiful mise en forme. One of my favorite blogs PingMag did a very nice article on him that you can read here. It’s worth a look! Also, you can find his workshop tumblr here. Enjoy!
anabargagli:

Orchid hunter, floral experimenter, wall typographer
A look into the novel orchid workshop of Yoichiro Uchida, in Fukuoka Japan. An interesting concept, and a beautiful mise en forme. One of my favorite blogs PingMag did a very nice article on him that you can read here. It’s worth a look! Also, you can find his workshop tumblr here. Enjoy!
anabargagli:

Orchid hunter, floral experimenter, wall typographer
A look into the novel orchid workshop of Yoichiro Uchida, in Fukuoka Japan. An interesting concept, and a beautiful mise en forme. One of my favorite blogs PingMag did a very nice article on him that you can read here. It’s worth a look! Also, you can find his workshop tumblr here. Enjoy!

anabargagli:

Orchid hunter, floral experimenter, wall typographer

A look into the novel orchid workshop of Yoichiro Uchida, in Fukuoka Japan. An interesting concept, and a beautiful mise en forme. One of my favorite blogs PingMag did a very nice article on him that you can read here. It’s worth a look! Also, you can find his workshop tumblr here. Enjoy!

anabargagli:

Japanese pakaging at it’s greatest. Kokeshi Matches created by Kumi Hirasaka anabargagli:

Japanese pakaging at it’s greatest. Kokeshi Matches created by Kumi Hirasaka anabargagli:

Japanese pakaging at it’s greatest. Kokeshi Matches created by Kumi Hirasaka anabargagli:

Japanese pakaging at it’s greatest. Kokeshi Matches created by Kumi Hirasaka anabargagli:

Japanese pakaging at it’s greatest. Kokeshi Matches created by Kumi Hirasaka

anabargagli:

Japanese pakaging at it’s greatest. Kokeshi Matches created by Kumi Hirasaka

anabargagli:

Sci-fi book covers by japanese artist Yuko Shimizu. What’s not to love? I’m always so impressed by Yuko’s work, go and check it out if you haven’t yet!

shougong:

Back in September, I attended the Textile Society of America’s 13th Biennial Symposium, Textiles and Politics. One presentation I looked forward to was Rowland Rickett’s “Pastoral or Political? Art/Work, Public Engagement, and Indigo Farming”. I’ve posted before about Rowland Ricketts’ work here, and his recent projects are just as exciting. IndiGrowing Blue, as described on the project’s Facebook page

is a participatory art project that through the growing and processing of Japanese indigo (Polygonum tinctorium) aims to explore our relationship to our raw materials and the environment from which they come. 
IndiGrowing Blue started in 2010 and is ongoing, with special events organized around the transplanting, harvesting, and processing of the indigo. 

He shared photos of himself and the local community harvesting indigo in Bloomington, and went on to discuss the exhibit “Fields of Indigo” at the Kranner Art Museum. Fresh indigo plants were brought into galleries and hung to dry to demonstrate their change in color, and dried plants carpeted the floor of another gallery for visitors to participate in winnowing the leaves from the plants (see first photo above). 
The gallery had a live sound stream set up, which tied in with sound streams in the indigo field in Bloomington and another in Tokushima, Japan on the webpage of related project, “I am Ai, We are Ai” (ai being Japanese for indigo). In Japan, traditional indigo dyers were invited to choose their favorite shade and dye a length of cloth. The lengths were cut up and put on display in locations that were once important to the indigo trade, but might now be parking lots or malls. Visitors were invited  to cut a circle of their favorite shade and create a button to wear. The strips of dyed cloth with their many holes were left up for the determined period of time, gaining more holes as new visitors arrived. Rowland Ricketts wore the button covered in his favorite cloth to his presentation for the TSA Symposium. 
shougong:

Back in September, I attended the Textile Society of America’s 13th Biennial Symposium, Textiles and Politics. One presentation I looked forward to was Rowland Rickett’s “Pastoral or Political? Art/Work, Public Engagement, and Indigo Farming”. I’ve posted before about Rowland Ricketts’ work here, and his recent projects are just as exciting. IndiGrowing Blue, as described on the project’s Facebook page

is a participatory art project that through the growing and processing of Japanese indigo (Polygonum tinctorium) aims to explore our relationship to our raw materials and the environment from which they come. 
IndiGrowing Blue started in 2010 and is ongoing, with special events organized around the transplanting, harvesting, and processing of the indigo. 

He shared photos of himself and the local community harvesting indigo in Bloomington, and went on to discuss the exhibit “Fields of Indigo” at the Kranner Art Museum. Fresh indigo plants were brought into galleries and hung to dry to demonstrate their change in color, and dried plants carpeted the floor of another gallery for visitors to participate in winnowing the leaves from the plants (see first photo above). 
The gallery had a live sound stream set up, which tied in with sound streams in the indigo field in Bloomington and another in Tokushima, Japan on the webpage of related project, “I am Ai, We are Ai” (ai being Japanese for indigo). In Japan, traditional indigo dyers were invited to choose their favorite shade and dye a length of cloth. The lengths were cut up and put on display in locations that were once important to the indigo trade, but might now be parking lots or malls. Visitors were invited  to cut a circle of their favorite shade and create a button to wear. The strips of dyed cloth with their many holes were left up for the determined period of time, gaining more holes as new visitors arrived. Rowland Ricketts wore the button covered in his favorite cloth to his presentation for the TSA Symposium. 
shougong:

Back in September, I attended the Textile Society of America’s 13th Biennial Symposium, Textiles and Politics. One presentation I looked forward to was Rowland Rickett’s “Pastoral or Political? Art/Work, Public Engagement, and Indigo Farming”. I’ve posted before about Rowland Ricketts’ work here, and his recent projects are just as exciting. IndiGrowing Blue, as described on the project’s Facebook page

is a participatory art project that through the growing and processing of Japanese indigo (Polygonum tinctorium) aims to explore our relationship to our raw materials and the environment from which they come. 
IndiGrowing Blue started in 2010 and is ongoing, with special events organized around the transplanting, harvesting, and processing of the indigo. 

He shared photos of himself and the local community harvesting indigo in Bloomington, and went on to discuss the exhibit “Fields of Indigo” at the Kranner Art Museum. Fresh indigo plants were brought into galleries and hung to dry to demonstrate their change in color, and dried plants carpeted the floor of another gallery for visitors to participate in winnowing the leaves from the plants (see first photo above). 
The gallery had a live sound stream set up, which tied in with sound streams in the indigo field in Bloomington and another in Tokushima, Japan on the webpage of related project, “I am Ai, We are Ai” (ai being Japanese for indigo). In Japan, traditional indigo dyers were invited to choose their favorite shade and dye a length of cloth. The lengths were cut up and put on display in locations that were once important to the indigo trade, but might now be parking lots or malls. Visitors were invited  to cut a circle of their favorite shade and create a button to wear. The strips of dyed cloth with their many holes were left up for the determined period of time, gaining more holes as new visitors arrived. Rowland Ricketts wore the button covered in his favorite cloth to his presentation for the TSA Symposium. 
shougong:

Back in September, I attended the Textile Society of America’s 13th Biennial Symposium, Textiles and Politics. One presentation I looked forward to was Rowland Rickett’s “Pastoral or Political? Art/Work, Public Engagement, and Indigo Farming”. I’ve posted before about Rowland Ricketts’ work here, and his recent projects are just as exciting. IndiGrowing Blue, as described on the project’s Facebook page

is a participatory art project that through the growing and processing of Japanese indigo (Polygonum tinctorium) aims to explore our relationship to our raw materials and the environment from which they come. 
IndiGrowing Blue started in 2010 and is ongoing, with special events organized around the transplanting, harvesting, and processing of the indigo. 

He shared photos of himself and the local community harvesting indigo in Bloomington, and went on to discuss the exhibit “Fields of Indigo” at the Kranner Art Museum. Fresh indigo plants were brought into galleries and hung to dry to demonstrate their change in color, and dried plants carpeted the floor of another gallery for visitors to participate in winnowing the leaves from the plants (see first photo above). 
The gallery had a live sound stream set up, which tied in with sound streams in the indigo field in Bloomington and another in Tokushima, Japan on the webpage of related project, “I am Ai, We are Ai” (ai being Japanese for indigo). In Japan, traditional indigo dyers were invited to choose their favorite shade and dye a length of cloth. The lengths were cut up and put on display in locations that were once important to the indigo trade, but might now be parking lots or malls. Visitors were invited  to cut a circle of their favorite shade and create a button to wear. The strips of dyed cloth with their many holes were left up for the determined period of time, gaining more holes as new visitors arrived. Rowland Ricketts wore the button covered in his favorite cloth to his presentation for the TSA Symposium. 

shougong:

Back in September, I attended the Textile Society of America’s 13th Biennial Symposium, Textiles and Politics. One presentation I looked forward to was Rowland Rickett’s “Pastoral or Political? Art/Work, Public Engagement, and Indigo Farming”. I’ve posted before about Rowland Ricketts’ work here, and his recent projects are just as exciting. IndiGrowing Blue, as described on the project’s Facebook page

is a participatory art project that through the growing and processing of Japanese indigo (Polygonum tinctorium) aims to explore our relationship to our raw materials and the environment from which they come. 


IndiGrowing Blue started in 2010 and is ongoing, with special events organized around the transplanting, harvesting, and processing of the indigo. 

He shared photos of himself and the local community harvesting indigo in Bloomington, and went on to discuss the exhibit “Fields of Indigo” at the Kranner Art Museum. Fresh indigo plants were brought into galleries and hung to dry to demonstrate their change in color, and dried plants carpeted the floor of another gallery for visitors to participate in winnowing the leaves from the plants (see first photo above). 

The gallery had a live sound stream set up, which tied in with sound streams in the indigo field in Bloomington and another in Tokushima, Japan on the webpage of related project, “I am Ai, We are Ai” (ai being Japanese for indigo). In Japan, traditional indigo dyers were invited to choose their favorite shade and dye a length of cloth. The lengths were cut up and put on display in locations that were once important to the indigo trade, but might now be parking lots or malls. Visitors were invited  to cut a circle of their favorite shade and create a button to wear. The strips of dyed cloth with their many holes were left up for the determined period of time, gaining more holes as new visitors arrived. Rowland Ricketts wore the button covered in his favorite cloth to his presentation for the TSA Symposium. 

(via eastasianstudiestumbl)

ruineshumaines:

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here.
ruineshumaines:

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here.
ruineshumaines:

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here.
ruineshumaines:

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here.
ruineshumaines:

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here.

ruineshumaines:

For nearly a decade since the late 1970s artist Takanori Aiba worked as a maze illustrator for Japanese fashion magazine POPYE. The following decade he worked as an architect and finally in 2003 decided to merge the two crafts—the design of physical space and the drawing of labyrinths—into these incredibly detailed tiny worlds. Using craft paper, plastic, plaster, acrylic resin, paint and other materials Aiba constructs sprawling miniature communities that wrap around bonsai trees, lighthouses, and amongst the cliffs of nearly vertical islands. I would love to visit every single one of these places, if only I was 6 feet shorter. See more of Aiba’s work here.

(via orientallyyours)

“If an object or expression can bring about, within us, a sense of serene melancholy and a spiritual longing, then that object can be said to be wabi-sabi…it nurtures all that is authentic by acknowledging three simple realities: nothing lasts, nothing is finished, and nothing is perfect.”
— (via windupwords)